Benefits of Data Centre Co-Location

Introduction

Data centres fall strictly in the business to business arena so the term data centre is therefore alien to the majority of the general public. Data centres are effectively large computer rooms or facilities dedicated to the accommodation of computer and networking hardware and associated telecommunications equipment. Data centres provide guaranteed regulated power supplies, hardware and network security and internet connectivity. They are usually located separately from the main business headquarters and can be owned by the business itself or by a 3rd party specialist service provider. Co-location and co-location hosting are terms used to describe the location of equipment for multiple clients within the same data centre. The huge growth in the demand for co-location services over the last couple of decades has been fuelled by the increasing reliance of businesses on mission critical IT systems.

Here are eight of the most compelling reasons for a business to outsource the housing and management of its computing facilities.

1. Cost savings
In house computer hardware often occupies precious space in prime office locations with rents at £50 per square foot per annum being commonplace in London. Locating computing facilities remotely allows this prime space

History of the Data Centre

The Beginning of the Computer Era – A Dedicated Room

While the data centre as we know it was perfected during the dot com boom of the late 1990s, data centres actually have their roots in the earliest beginnings of the computer era. Early computer systems, which were huge, room-sized machines, required a lot of space and a controlled environment. The complexity of operating and maintaining these machines also led to the practice of secluding them in dedicated rooms.

Computer security became a consideration during this era. These early computers were incredibly expensive, and many of them were used for military purposes or important civilian business ventures. A dedicated room allowed businesses and organizations to control access to the machine.

Another factor influencing the trend toward separate computer rooms was the need to keep systems cool. Early computer systems used a great deal of power and were prone to overheating. Dedicated rooms could be climate controlled to compensate for the tendency to overheat.

These early computers required a multitude of component-connecting cables, and these cables needed to be organized. This led to the creation of some of the data center standards we know today.

flag

How the Cloud Is Fundamental to Smart Mobile Computing

A large number of the apps that we all use on our mobile phones and tablets incorporate a variation of cloud computing in some sense, because many of them fundamentally rely on the idea that they are providing us with a packaged-up experience of what are essentially web applications. This approach to mobile apps allows the user to access an array of content and functions which they could not physically store on their mobile device. Therefore, cloud computing on mobile devices has fairly specific benefits for mobile users in comparison to users of PCs to the extent that cloud computing is core to the development of computing itself on such ‘smart’ devices, particularly since the launch of 3G networks and the ability to transfer data that that offers. What’s more, with the advent of the higher bandwidths of 4G upon us, the concept of maximising mobile data and processes within the cloud – and minimising the amount stored on individual devices – is only set to carry on expanding.

The list of the categories and types of applications that use and/or rely on cloud computing is extensive to say